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North Carolina Man Helping People with Credit Accused of Fraud

There are many different people in the world. For example, there are those who want nothing more in their life than to help others become more successful. Unfortunately, federal officials say that a man in North Carolina was actually practicing fraud instead of helping people struggling with debt.

It is unclear what initially attracted federal attention to the man. However, officials say that the man was recruiting people with poor credit, helping them to repair their credit reports. Unfortunately, police say this sometimes involved filing police reports that they believe to be false, claiming that the people were actually victims of identity theft.

Additionally, police say that the man created fake automobile dealerships. Under the names of these dealerships, he is accused of selling fake cars to his "recruits," and taking out loans in their names. He and his so-called recruits would then split the proceeds of the loans. Police say that the man made $1 million in this manner.  It is unclear if anyone else will be charged as a result of the investigation.

The North Carolina man faced multiple charges as a result of the allegations against him, including wire and bank fraud to which he recently pleaded guilty. There are multiple reasons why a person would consider pleading guilty. Sometimes such a plea comes after a defendant recognizes that there may be sufficient evidence to meet the burden of proof required by a criminal court even if the individual is not guilty. On some occasions, upon consultation with a criminal defense attorney, people may decide that pleading guilty is in their best interests, particularly if a plea agreement offering favorable sentencing considerations is available.

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